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After Newspeak : language, culture and politics in Russia from Gorbachev to Putin / Michael S. Gorham

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Material Type
E-books
Author
Gorham, Michael S., author.
Publication Info.
Ithaca ; London : Cornell University Press, 2014.
Publication Info.
©2014

Details

Description
1 online resource
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
text file
PDF
Series
JSTOR EBA.
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents
Introduction: ideologies, economies, and technologies of language -- The Soviet legacy: from political to cultural correctness -- Glasnost unleashed: language ideologies in the Gorbachev revolution -- Economies of profanity: free speech and varieties of language degradation -- In defense of the national tongue: guardians, legislators, and monitors of the norm -- Taking the offensive: language culture and policy under Putin -- Cyber curtain or Glasnost 2.0? strategies for web-based communication in the new media age -- Conclusion -- Appendix -- Works cited -- Index.
Note
Print version record.
Summary
In After Newspeak, Michael S. Gorham presents a cultural history of the politics of Russian language from Gorbachev and glasnost to Putin and the emergence of new generations of Web technologies. Gorham begins from the premise that periods of rapid and radical change both shape and are shaped by language. He documents the role and fate of the Russian language in the collapse of the USSR and the decades of reform and national reconstruction that have followed. Gorham demonstrates the inextricable linkage of language and politics in everything from dictionaries of profanity to the flood of publications on linguistic self-help, the speech patterns of the country's leaders, the blogs of its bureaucrats, and the official programs promoting the use of Russian in the so-called "near abroad."Gorham explains why glasnost figured as such a critical rhetorical battleground in the political strife that led to the Soviet Union's collapse and shows why Russians came to deride the newfound freedom of speech of the 1990s as little more than the right to swear in public. He assesses the impact of Medvedev's role as Blogger-in-Chief and the role Putin's vulgar speech practices played in the restoration of national pride. And he investigates whether Internet communication and new media technologies have helped to consolidate a more vibrant democracy and civil society or if they serve as an additional resource for the political technologies manipulated by the Kremlin
Language
In English.
Local Note
JSTOR
Subject
Language policy -- Russia (Federation)
POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Public Policy -- Cultural Policy.
SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Anthropology -- Cultural.
SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Popular Culture.
Language policy. (OCoLC)fst00992402
Russia (Federation) (OCoLC)fst01262050
Genre/Form
Electronic books.
Electronic books.
Electronic books.
In:
Title is part of the collection: De Gruyter Rights, Action, and Social Responsibility
Other Form:
Print version: Gorham, Michael S. After Newspeak 9780801452628 (DLC) 2013038096 (OCoLC)861120060
ISBN
9780801470578 (electronic bk.)
0801470579 (electronic bk.)
9780801452628
0801452627
9780801479267
0801479266
0801470560
9780801470561
Standard No.
10.7591/9780801470578 doi